quenched-ladyneptune-main

Please excuse the Marmite cliché, but it feels apt here…

‘Destroys The Moon’ is the second release from Lady Neptune (the alter ego of London-based musician and visual artist Moema Meade) and, quite frankly, you’re either going to love it or hate it.

The bedroom-produced five-track EP is a concept record full of fuzzy punk-tinged guitar, unhinged noise digressions and soft echoey vocals. However, the vocal often sounds muffled like she’s singing underwater — also the ‘echo’ is quite emphasised in places as if she’s singing in to a traffic cone. This may be intentional, of course, and lend itself to her vision of a world of fantasy and escape.

As I listen, I’m reminded of the Lenny Kravitz album ‘Mama Said’, full of fuzzy funk rock and psychedelic soul, but particularly the song ‘Fields of Joy’ and, particularly still, track 10 — the ‘reprise’. It’s always had the feel of a filler track, although it was okay and did fit with the rest of the album, and was one that many (including myself) probably found themselves skipping after a while. Hard to imagine ‘Mama Said’ would have sold over three million copies worldwide if all songs on the album sounded like that one.

The EP ends (if you get that far) with ‘Life On Neptune’, a collection of haphazard sounds presumably meant to be transcendental and akin to those you might hear during space travel or from another planet. It’s nothing more than random noise and isn’t a joy to listen to.

Maybe I’m missing out having never been part of the culture that listened to music through drug-enhanced ears but, while there are some nice melodies to be found, it’s ultimately 30 minutes of abstract noise layered with repetitive lyrics.

‘Destroys The Moon’ was released on 24th March on the Manchester-based Icecapades label.

Words by Paula Edwards

MORE

BLOSSOMS, INTERVIEW, CAMP BESTIVAL
FOR many the last few years have absolutely flown by. Election after election, tragedy after tragedy, humane coming together of community, solidarity, Iceland, the year of the celebrity death, Pokemon Go. Too much to remember. Yet for four lads, who unbeknownst to them spent the whole of their lives living within 2km of each other, […]
NICK MULVEY, INTERVIEW, CAMP BESTIVAL
“WHEN you’re finished changing, you’re finished,” is how the antiquated adage from founding father Benjamin Franklin goes. That ability to be flexible and change when the time is right. Hundreds of years-ago that famous line was uttered, but it’s never felt more relevant, and for former modern-jazz-turned-songwriter-come-newly-christened-father Nick Mulvey, changing and maturing has always been […]
JOE INNES & THE CAVALCADE, FOREIGN DOMESTIC POLICY, INTERVIEW
“You know with this climate at the minute everything is changing,” London-based Joe Innes tell Quenched Music. With his new album ‘Foreign Domestic Policy’ taking years to finally arrange, it’s hardly surprising it’s become a labour of love for the self-confessed post-Brexit indie songwriter. “It took it’s time but that’s because in the time I […]
COMMON PEOPLE, SOUTHAMPTON, LIVE
AS THE final stragglers danced their way from the Common People main stage, the filthy sounds of favourite headliner Sean Paul still ringing around the ears, it was time for the organisers to reflect on how successful this year’s festival was. 40,000 flocked to Southampton’s Common in anticipation of yet another Bank Holiday jaunt on […]
SIMPLE MINDS, MAYFLOWER THEATRE, SOUTHAMPTON, LIVE
IN SIMPLE terms the word ‘acoustic’ means not having electrical amplification. But as Glaswegian new-wave act Simple Minds triumphantly demonstrated to a packed house at Southampton’s Mayflower Theatre, definitions are subjective. You would be forgiven for expecting longstanding Minds members Jim Kerr, the idyllic vocalist and endearing frontman since the group first formed in 1977, […]
CARELESS PEOPLE, CHARLOTTE OC, ALBUM, RECORDED
FOR SOMETIME, Charlotte Mary O’Connor – aka Charlotte OC – has been the electro-soulstress on the cusp of brilliance. Her 2013 track ‘Colour My Heart’ remains one of the darkened pop classics that finally distanced her from the bratty pop career Sony had once dreamt she would have. And in the four-years since, critics, fans […]